Monthly Archives: March 2012

The Silent Truth: Sexual Assault Against Women in the Military

Another morning of flipping through random video clips drew my heart to this one. This video clip tells the story of Private LaVena Lynn Johnson who died in Iraq. Initially the family was informed by the U.S. Military that Ms. Johnson had committed suicide. Since then, the story has become much more murky, raising questions of a cover-up by the military. Ms Johnson is now believe to have been physically assault, raped, shot in the head, and set on fire. Please see the video clip below.

I must say that I post this blog, not because Ms. Johnson was black, but because she, like many other women who risk their lives on the battlefield to defend our safety, has fallen victim to a system that boasts a high level of valor, respectability, and honor. This is not to assert that all members of the U.S. Military are attacking these women (my brother served in the military for 10 years and I be hard pressed to believe he could ever commit such an action), but the fact that incidents like these can persist in systems like these invokes in me a level of frustration that I cannot fully comprehend.

We often think of women as mothers, daughter, sisters, cousins, nieces, granddaughters, all of which come with a loving connotation. There are also the “not-so-nice” classifications of women: slut, ho, bitch, whore (which I’d like to point out are just as easily associated with men… just saying…). But we often forget that, above all else, women are human beings born with the right to feel secure in all walks of life, whether in supermarket or the Military. So I dedicate this post, not only to Private LaVena Lynn Johnson, but the various other women who have lost their lives in the battle against rape and sexual assault. May your spirits be at rest and the hearts of your families on day be at ease.

Aside

Ignorance is Bliss: The Plight of Race Based Affinity Groups in the 21st Century As a pre-frosh, I came to Williams with the intent to distance myself from black people. Having been born and raised in Brooklyn, NY around shady … Continue reading

Song of the Day: Boobie Miles – Big K.R.I.T.

There are some artist out of the South I truly respect. Big K.R.I.T. is definitely one of them. 9 times out of 10, I criticize people for listening to the instrumental of a song instead of the lyrics. However, I will admit my hypocrisy on this one. The instrumental is definitely the first thing that drew my attention to this one. This is one of the songs off of his new mixtape, 4eva and a Day.

I also must admit that I greatly appreciate the album cover. In a way, it encapsulates the soulful, rhythmic vibe of the blues in it’s color scheme (which resonated with several of the instrumentals), as well as a the chasm we often straddle between purity and pleasure (note the bible and church on the left side of the cover split juxtaposed to the strip club and bottle of liquor on the right side). Yea, I’m a Big K.R.I.T. fan. Hope you enjoy.

The Unequal Opportunity Race

https://i0.wp.com/aapf.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Picture209.jpg

A few days ago, I came across the African American Policy Forum, a project dedicated to discussing issues like intersectionality, affirmative action, and structural racism. The website specifically focuses on how these issues relate to African-American communities and how individuals from these communities can get involved in the conversation. Overall, the website is well-structured and very informative. For those interested in learning more about the project, click the link below.

http://aapf.org/mission/mission-2/

On the website, I came across a video that depicts the Unequal Opportunity Race. The video is about 4 minutes long, and is without words. The effect of having a video without words is that the images really are forced to speak for themselves. I thought that the video made some interesting points. I personally would have used different images, but it did raise some thoughts. Take a look at the video below, and let us know what you think.